I am Mutya, I am pro-life.

Setting aside party colors, I would like to manifest my total objection to the re-imposition of Death Penalty in the Philippines. It seems that the majority of the House are in hurry to pass the “devilish” bill. Killing our own people is not the solution. If you are losing your hopes, if you are pressured to approve this inhumane measure because of political reasons—–please do not do it.

Killing our fellow Filipinos is cannibalistic and the government should not participate on this. It is not your business, not your mandate, and not even your calling. You are elected to represent the Filipino people across economic background, color and religion, thus you should dismiss bills which threatened our liberty and even they are part of the minority.

Death Penalty is anti-poor. Please check the records. The rich who could afford expert counsel were released alive, like a happy Maya, while the poor who have no access to competent defense suffered the capital punishment of death.

Open your eyes, the Supreme Court said that 7 out of 10 death penalty cases in the past have judicial error. Our criminal justice system is far from perfect. Sad to say, it could even be swayed by money. The blind-folded Lady Justice sometimes is not fair and just. We can’t let the lives of our fellowmen be played under the influence of dirty money and political connections.

Death Penalty is irreversible, thus we don’t have any chance to correct any wrong. Furthermore, it also prevents a person from contemplating and learning from his past mistakes. As a nation, we should aim for restorative justice. Killing a criminal will not heal the victims. It further opens the wound perpetually without closure. Before a person becomes a criminal, he is a human being and as a human being, we are believed to be innately good especially when given the right circumstances. The rise of criminality is the result of poor governance and widespread corruption that results to poverty.

Honorable Representatives of the people, let’s remember the cases of Fernando Galera, a 26 years old, fish vendor, innocent but sentenced to death because he can’t afford to pay competent lawyers, Richard Ong, 33 years old, innocent who was sentenced to death in 1994.  He was tortured and confessed something which he didn’t do. Hideshi Suzuki, 38, Japanese man sentenced to death in 1994 because of marijuana trafficking. He claimed that the marijuana was planted on him by a police officer. (M. Fajardo, Death Penalty in the Philippines).

Clearly, we are not ready for death penalty. We should dismiss this measure and focus on solutions that matter. Let us prevent evil forces from using Death Penalty to silence its critics and from erasing the poor from the crust of the Philippines.

The state has no right to kill a person without granting him the full protection of the laws. No person shall be deprived of life!

#Mutya

 

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